Ships full of men are history – at least in arctic marine research

When the first Fram-expedition returned to Norway in 1896, after three years frozen into the ice of the Arctic Ocean, a crew of 13 men was enthusiastically welcomed home and celebrated as heroes, above all the young Fridtjof Nansen. Hundred and twenty-five years after Fram, research vessels are exploring the Arctic Ocean on more regular basis, and onboard are men no longer among themselves. Women have become important contributors to the scientific exploration of the Arctic Ocean.

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Runoff of meltwater from land-based glaciers to the Barents Sea

Interview with Louise Steffensen Schmidt (The Nansen Legacy), Postdoc at the Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo. Recently, she presented her research work in the lecture: Variability in glacier meltwater runoff to the Barents Sea, at the 3rd Nansen Legacy annual meeting, 10-12 November 2020.

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What controls cyclone variability in the Barents Sea?

The jet stream is a highway for cyclones, while the sea ice edge has been thought to be a fuel station. Erica Madonnas new study shows that the fuel for cyclones is not simply linked to the location of the ice edge. She explains Barents Sea cyclones as a traffic system.

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When Murphy Wins

Scientists in movies and on television are often presented as brilliant people, knowing exactly what they do and what they want to achieve, furthermore, their experiments always succeed. That is, if they fail, they fail spectacularly, becoming mutants, blowing up the world or some such. This post is about real scientists and failing unspectacularly.

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What do the smallest animals in the Arctic eat?

Understanding who eats who is important to describe how nutrition and energy move between species in marine ecosystems. The field of research is flourishing like never before thanks to new technology and more advanced methods. These allow us to uncover hitherto unknown connections that occasionally shake up known paradigms in ecology.

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